»

Let Your Mind Grow Into the Ground

Somewhere between suburban boredom and rural desolation. The word isn't lazy, it's irresponsible.

Home Archive RSS Ask
vintagenatgeographic:

Waterfalls spring to life during a storm along the Milford Track, a trail in New Zealand’s Fiordland National Park
National Geographic | January 1978

vintagenatgeographic:

Waterfalls spring to life during a storm along the Milford Track, a trail in New Zealand’s Fiordland National Park

National Geographic | January 1978

(via d-vn)

mynamesjustanoose:


"[On] May 2, 1967, 30 fully armed members of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense and their supporters were in the California State Capitol at Sacramento, California, protesting the infamous Mulford Act. The bill on its face was aimed at banning a U.S. citizen’s right to carry loaded weapons in public, so long as the weapons were “registered, not concealed, and not pointed in a threatening manner.”
In actuality the Mulford Act – or “the Panther Bill,” as it was tagged by the media – was designed to end the BPP Police Patrols that were organized against police brutality in the Afrikan community; as it was the Panther Party’s belief that “armed citizen patrols and the arming of the citizenry as guaranteed by the Constitution were the most effective deterrents to excessive use of police force.”
The alarmed and instantaneous reaction to the fully armed BPP in Sacramento further confirmed this, and then Gov. Ronald Reagan’s signing of the bill into law catapulted the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense into national prominence.
Three months prior to this, in March 1967, the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) had begun an “internal security” investigation of Huey Newton, prompting then FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover to announce, on Sept. 8, 1968, that the BPP was considered to be “the greatest threat to the internal security of the country.” At the time, the Black Panther Party was barely known outside of Oakland, Calif.
Despite these dire pronouncements, BPP Deputy Minister of Defense for Southern California Alprentice “Bunchy” Carter organized the Southern California branch of the BPP, with a branch office at Central Avenue and 43rd in January 1968, and January 1969 saw the BPP Free Breakfast for Children Program (FBCP) firmly under way at St. Augustine’s Church in Oakland. At that point, membership of the BPP was peaking at 10,000 members within the continental U.S. alone, and circulation of the Black Panther Newspaper had hit 139,000 by 1970.
Between 1967 and 1969, the Black Panther Party for Self Defense not only grew in local, national and international stature, they forged unity with other oppressed people and inspired the formation of the 12- and 13-point political platforms of the Brown Beret, I Wor Kuen and Young Lords political organizations.
By 1980, the Black Panther Party for Self Defense was no more, due to the depredations of FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover’s extensive program – COINTELPRO – of surveillance, infiltration, perjury, disruption, misdirection, police harassment and assassinations of party members within U.S. borders that were designed to make the political criminal.”
—Bay View National Black Newspaper

Solid reminder that gun control in America usually, if not always, has extremely racist roots an undertones, as well as that mainstream political parties flip flop and do whatever’s in their own best interest at the time

mynamesjustanoose:

"[On] May 2, 1967, 30 fully armed members of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense and their supporters were in the California State Capitol at Sacramento, California, protesting the infamous Mulford Act. The bill on its face was aimed at banning a U.S. citizen’s right to carry loaded weapons in public, so long as the weapons were “registered, not concealed, and not pointed in a threatening manner.”

In actuality the Mulford Act – or “the Panther Bill,” as it was tagged by the media – was designed to end the BPP Police Patrols that were organized against police brutality in the Afrikan community; as it was the Panther Party’s belief that “armed citizen patrols and the arming of the citizenry as guaranteed by the Constitution were the most effective deterrents to excessive use of police force.”

The alarmed and instantaneous reaction to the fully armed BPP in Sacramento further confirmed this, and then Gov. Ronald Reagan’s signing of the bill into law catapulted the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense into national prominence.

Three months prior to this, in March 1967, the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) had begun an “internal security” investigation of Huey Newton, prompting then FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover to announce, on Sept. 8, 1968, that the BPP was considered to be “the greatest threat to the internal security of the country.” At the time, the Black Panther Party was barely known outside of Oakland, Calif.

Despite these dire pronouncements, BPP Deputy Minister of Defense for Southern California Alprentice “Bunchy” Carter organized the Southern California branch of the BPP, with a branch office at Central Avenue and 43rd in January 1968, and January 1969 saw the BPP Free Breakfast for Children Program (FBCP) firmly under way at St. Augustine’s Church in Oakland. At that point, membership of the BPP was peaking at 10,000 members within the continental U.S. alone, and circulation of the Black Panther Newspaper had hit 139,000 by 1970.

Between 1967 and 1969, the Black Panther Party for Self Defense not only grew in local, national and international stature, they forged unity with other oppressed people and inspired the formation of the 12- and 13-point political platforms of the Brown Beret, I Wor Kuen and Young Lords political organizations.

By 1980, the Black Panther Party for Self Defense was no more, due to the depredations of FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover’s extensive program – COINTELPRO – of surveillance, infiltration, perjury, disruption, misdirection, police harassment and assassinations of party members within U.S. borders that were designed to make the political criminal.”

Bay View National Black Newspaper

Solid reminder that gun control in America usually, if not always, has extremely racist roots an undertones, as well as that mainstream political parties flip flop and do whatever’s in their own best interest at the time

(Source: america-wakiewakie, via creatureofhabitx)

Something that is pointless when you are 29:

Seeking acceptance from others. Do what you do because you love it not because you want anyone to acknowledge it. I need to keep reminding myself of that.

inkspirationstattooing:

Jay (J-Boy) Adams - February 3, 1961 – August 15, 2014 
"The spark that ignited the sport"
Rest in peace… You will be missed…

inkspirationstattooing:

Jay (J-Boy) Adams - February 3, 1961 – August 15, 2014 

"The spark that ignited the sport"

Rest in peace… You will be missed…

(via killerofsnakes)

selfdefensefamily:

This album was recorded in one day.

Your pop-punk album took two months.

Letting my heart die

is one of the most liberating feelings I have ever experienced. You should all try it some time. For the first time in my life I feel calloused enough to truly accept certain things and to move on. It has to be dead for a while. it will come back, I am sure, with the right person at the right time, but for now, I belong to no one and have emotional obligations to only my close fiends and family. This rules.

toddroeth:

The Champ.
Plumb Champion Axe - circa 1930, restored and rehung on 30” fawn foot American Hickory haft.

toddroeth:

The Champ.

Plumb Champion Axe - circa 1930, restored and rehung on 30” fawn foot American Hickory haft.

(via widgetdr)